Lean Thinking

Tuesday, 29 November 2016 17:42

Coaching vs Capability Building

Published in Agile

If you work for a large organisation and you want to transform the way you work to be more agile, what's the first thing you do? Chances are it's hiring a coach or two. That's not a bad way to start. Experienced people to guide the transformation make things much easier. But what do you do once the first pilot is done, you have proven that it works and demand is growing? More and more people are wanting agility. Your current coaches can't handle the load. What do you do?

What most organisations do is here some more coaches. And some more coaches, and more coaches and more as demand continues to grow. Now, as an agile coach, this has kept me in work for many years so I may be shooting myself in the foot a little when I say that this is a really lousy way to do an agile transformation. Yes, that's right. You heard it. An agile coach says that hiring a bunch of agile coaches is not a good way to transform an organisation. Let's look at why and then look at how we can do things better.

Published in Agile

As an agile coach I am always pushing for cultural change. That's what agile is really - it's not a delivery mechanism, it's a fundamental change in the culture of an organisation. What do we mean by organisational culture? There are many definitions but the one that I like is that culture is a shared understanding of values. It's the understanding everyone has of what the organisation thinks is important. Culture drives behaviour - people will seek to maximise what is considered important in the culture and will behave in ways that do that.

The problem of course is that, as anyone will tell you, cultural change is hard. CEOs are tasked with changing culture and spend years failing to do it. People say that the only way to change culture is to change all the people. Or that cultural change only happens when a generation of employees retire. I don't agree. Cultural change is really easy. You just need to let people know what the organisation values. "Hang on", I hear you say, "Just wait a minute. Organisations have been putting out statements for years about what they want in their new culture. People can often quote chapter and verse from the CEO's latest values statement. Millions are spent on flashy communications. And nothing changes."

Tuesday, 18 August 2015 11:41

Talk at the Agile@Scale Meetup

Published in Agile

Hi Folks. Something a bit different today. It's a video post. Specifically, the video of my talk at the Agile@Scale Meetup in Sydney a couple of weeks ago.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rC54siNInA will take you there (Sorry... can't embed the video).

The presentation I used can be found on Slideshare here, or on my Google Drive here.

And if you want to know more about the Agile@Scale meetup, you can find them here.

Published in Agile

First up, a huge thanks to Mike Pollard for the inspiration on this one. This all started with a meeting invite from Mike to set up some experiments in organisational change. We all know that organisational change is hard. Organisations tend to resist change so doing any sort of substantial change is a lot of work, and also prone to failure as organisations slip quietly back into their old way of doing things. Since real agile success relies somewhat on changing some pretty fundamental things in the organisation, this has always been a pretty major limiting factor in agile adoptions - success relies on change and is limited by how much change we can introduce. Change is hard which limits the amount of success we can have.

Mike's idea was quite simple - rather than try to change the whole organisation, why not set up some small experiments instead? That gives the organisation a low risk way to see what works and what doesn't. Once we have some successful experiments we should have some good, hard data to back us up when we push for a wider rollout.

Published in Agile

Faster, Better, Cheaper. That's the way agile is usually sold. Faster delivery, with better quality and lower cost. That's the pitch I hear over and over from people trying to get organisations on board with agile. It's an attractive pitch too. Who wouldn't want something faster, better and cheaper? The only problem with the pitch is that it's not really true. Not initially anyway. Agility will eventually get an organisation delivering faster, better and cheaper but, at least initially, it will be slower and more expensive (it will usually be better quality though). It may well stay slower and more expensive for a long time if the organisation has to overcome a lot of legacy (not just code but culture and processes as well).

So when the organisation goes to measure its new agile initiative and finds that it's not getting what it was sold, questions get asked. And well they should. The first is usually "Why?", to which the standard answer is "cultural change is hard....", the next is usually "When?", to which the answer is usually a shrug and some more about how hard cultural change is. This is often the point where the senior leaders that were really keen on agile, suddenly stop being keen on agile and organisational support vanishes. Given the length of time it takes a big organisation to get to faster, better, cheaper with agile, we really do ourselves no favours by using that as our selling point. What we need is something we can have an immediate (or at least relatively quick) impact on, that is also going to have a positive impact on the business. Fortunately it exists - risk. Agility should be sold as a means of reducing risk.

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