Lean Thinking

Written by Published in Agile

How do things get funded in the organisation you work for? If you work for most organisations, a business case will be prepared and submitted to management for approval. The conversation around approval will invariably be based around cost and benefit - how much will this cost and how much will this make? This leads to some pretty well known problems. I have written about these problems before (The Problem with Projects and Outcome Based Funding) and they are pretty well known. Ask anyone involved in funding approvals and they will tell you that the process is pretty bad and things need to be done to improve it.

Organisations have tried many things - fast track funding for small initiatives, streamlined approvals processes, delegated approvals, all sorts of things, but the process remains inflexible, flawed and generally broken. I think this comes not from a flawed process but from a flawed starting assumption - that cost vs benefit is the correct way to allocate money. I think we are asking entirely the wrong question. No amount of tweaking the process will help if the process is answering the wrong question. So what is the right question? I think we should stop asking "how much will it cost" and start asking "how much should we invest".

11 April 2017

Lead by Example

Written by Published in Agile

Leadership is crucial to a large scale agile transformation. You can go so far bottom up but to achieve any sort of real scale you need to get some leaders involved. A lot of what I do day to day is get leaders involved and engaged in the transformation process. When talking to leaders, this question inevitably comes up - "What is the single most important thing I can do as a leader to make this work?" For quite some time, my standard answer has been "Set a good example."

Have we ever seen this situation - the boss has just announced a fantastic new agile change program and that he or she is right behind it. "Agile is the most important thing the organisation can be doing" they say. But over the next few weeks it becomes clear that they aren't turning up to the business scrum, are too busy to make the sprint review, can't afford the time to attend backlog refinement. Then other people's attendance starts to drift off. "Too busy" becomes the standard excuse for missing something. The agile transformation falters, struggles on for a while, then vanishes without a trace.

21 March 2017

Everyday agility

Written by Published in Agile

I was having a discussion the other day about the difference between "doing" agile and "being" Agile. My standard question when asked this is - "how agile is your life outside of work?" Usually people look at me like I have grown a second head at this point, visions running through their head of family sprint planning events ("No dad, I can't accept the washing up card, I already have the homework card and that is much higher priority. You said so yourself.") and having to get out of bed late at night to move the "special cuddling" card from backlog to in progress. That's not what I mean. I don't expect people to live their life according to 2 weeks sprints. That would be "doing" agile at home. Which would be a bad idea.

What I mean is - when you have a problem to solve outside of work, do you naturally use agile principles to do it? This also tends to produce confused looks so I usually explain by running people through the way I write this blog (yes, this is going to be a blog post about writing blog posts. It will get a bit meta). When I first started this blog a good few years ago now, it was a bit...erratic. Essentially I never found the time to do the writing so posts just didn't happen. So I was faced with a problem - how do I make sure that work gets delivered? My answer to that was to establish a cadence.

Written by Published in Agile

We were having a discussion about coaching teams at work a few weeks ago, in particular how deeply embedded a coach should be, so I naturally got to thinking about teaching kids to ride bikes. I know that sounds like a stretch but stick with me. Back quite a few years ago when I was teaching my kids how to ride, I did a lot of observing of other parents and, being a geek, did a bunch of reading online about how to go about it. There are generally two accepted ways to teach kid to ride and the difference is on how long to leave the training wheels on.

Method one leaves the training wheels on for a long time - until the child is "fully confident" and the second leaves the training wheels on for the shortest possible time (there is a third radical method that rejects the training wheel altogether but we shall leave such heresy out of this discussion for now). I was, for the record, a method two parent but I observed a lot of parents using both methods. Method one is the intuitive one - leave the training wheels on until the kids knows how to ride then take them off and away they go. Easy. Trouble is, it quite often doesn't work out that way because training wheels have some significant disadvantages.

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