Lean Thinking

Written by Published in Agile

Today I'll start looking at organisational alignment patterns. The first thing I should do is explain what the heck I mean by that. In this context, organisational alignment is which parts of the organisation are supporting an agile adoption. This is a really key thing to know because where the support for agile is coming from will seriously affect how agile can be introduced, how far it can go before it meets resistance, the type of resistance it can meet and so on. Having worked as a coach in a number of companies, I have found that organisations tend to align around agile in a number of fairly standard ways. I call these standard ways alignment patterns. There are two dimensions to an alignment pattern - vertical (which layers of the business are aligned) and horizontal (which parts of the business are aligned).

If you can pick which alignment pattern you are dealing with, that gives you some insight into the sorts of issues you will experience when managing an agile transition. Knowing your alignment pattern lets you pick the right adoption pattern to get the best success. Essentially, different alignment patterns work well with certain adoption patterns while blocking others. Pick the adoption pattern that matches your alignment pattern and things will go smoother than picking one that is incompatible. Or if you want to use a particular adoption pattern but it's incompatible with the current alignment pattern, then you may need to change the organisational alignment before proceeding. Anyway. I'll talk more about this mixing of patterns later. First I'll start by describing the basic alignment patterns, starting with the most common - the bottom up pattern.

16 September 2014

Agile Patterns

Written by Published in Agile

Last post I briefly mentioned a patterns based approach to agile adoption within enterprises. I should probably spend a little time explaining what I mean by that. The first question, of course, is what do I mean by a pattern?

Back a few years, when things were still made by hand, a craftsman who wanted to make a set of things that were the same each time would make one reference piece, measured and constructed very accurately, and use it to create more pieces that looked the same. That reference piece would be carefully labelled with instructions on which way to align wood grains (or whatever was appropriate) and which techniques to use to construct it. This reference piece was called a pattern. There was even a specialised skill within workshops called patternmaker, with its own set of specialised (and very accurate) tools. So a pattern is a template or a guide to doing something. It's a way to reliably and consistently make copies of something.

02 September 2014

SAFe SPC Course

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A few weeks ago, I went on the SAFe SPC course, and passed the exam which means I'm a fully qualified, newly minted SAFe Program Consultant. I thought I'd give you a quick rundown of the course and my impressions of SAFe now that I'm apparently some kind of SAFe Jedi master.

For those who have been living under a rock for the last few years, SAFe (Scaled Agile Framework For Enterprises) is, as the name suggests, a scaling methodology for enterprise agile adoption. It is, to put it mildly, somewhat controversial, with many deeply in love with the methodology and some very strongly against it for many reasons. In the interests of full disclosure, I should say at the outset that I went into the course as someone pretty much on the anti-SAFe side. There were many things about the methodology that I didn't like, but I'm a big believer in giving things a fair go, so when the chance came up to go on the course, I figured I'd give it a go and let the other side have its say. So... what was it like?

19 August 2014

Control Charts

Written by Published in Lean

A couple of posts ago I promised you a post on Control Charts. Here it is. For those of you who have never come across these before, they are come from the field of Statistical Process Control (no... really... don't go...stay with me here... it's worth it, I promise). They provide a means of charting process data in a way that answers the single most important question you should be thinking of when looking at a chart of process data. No it's "not when can I go home?", or even "I wonder whether stabbing myself in the eye with this pencil will be more interesting?". It's – "what's normal?". When does the chart show normal variation and when does it show something I should be concerned about? Is this spike in the data something I need to investigate, or is it normal?

There are about a dozen different types of control chart for different types of data and you can use the various types to build a chart for just about any metric you choose, but for an agile project the most useful ones to chart are Velocity and Lead/Cycle Time. Even better, these two metrics use the simplest possible type of control chart – the IMR chart or Individual & Moving Range chart.

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